Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride

A jacket draped over a motorcycle bears patches from numerous Air Force squadrons Aug. 26, 2016 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The 49th Wing Safety office hosts a ride every year to promote safe habits and improve riders’ skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

A jacket draped over a motorcycle bears patches from numerous Air Force squadrons Aug. 26, 2016 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The 49th Wing Safety office hosts a ride every year to promote safe habits and improve riders’ skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

Motorcyclists sign in and fill out a waiver before Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride Aug. 26, 2016 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The 100-mile ride was an opportunity for riders of all experience levels to practice safe habits and improve their skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

Motorcyclists sign in and fill out a waiver before Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride Aug. 26, 2016 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The 100-mile ride was an opportunity for riders of all experience levels to practice safe habits and improve their skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

Daniel, a 49th Wing Safety technician, gives a safety briefing before Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride Aug. 26, 2016 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. Daniel has over 40 years of motorcycle-riding experience and constantly reminds Airmen to practice safe habits when riding. (Last names are being withheld due to operational requirements. U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

Daniel, a 49th Wing Safety technician, gives a safety briefing before Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride Aug. 26, 2016 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. Daniel has over 40 years of motorcycle-riding experience and constantly reminds Airmen to practice safe habits when riding. (Last names are being withheld due to operational requirements. U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

Riders participating in Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride drive through High Rolls, N.M., Aug. 26, 2016. Nearly 40 riders participated in the 100-mile ride stretching from Holloman Air Force Base to Ruidoso and back. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

Riders participating in Holloman’s 2016 Motorcycle Ride drive through High Rolls, N.M., Aug. 26, 2016. Nearly 40 riders participated in the 100-mile ride stretching from Holloman Air Force Base to Ruidoso and back. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

(Editor's Note: Last names are being withheld due to operational requirements.)

The 49th Wing Safety office hosted the annual Holloman Motorcycle Ride here Aug. 26.

Nearly 40 riders from Holloman participated in the 100-mile ride that promoted safe habits and improved riders’ skills.

“It’s a great opportunity for all kinds of riders,” said Daniel, a 49th Wing Safety Technician. “This gives an opportunity for some of the riders to go through some of the hills and practice some of their skills that they have learned.”

For some new riders, like Airman 1st Class Keagen, the trip gives them a chance to practice their skills in the mountains.

“This is my first time riding with a large group,” said Keagen, a 49th Material Maintenance Squadron power production technician. “Just riding with other people is a great experience.”

Daniel recognizes the dangers associated with riding motorcycles, and reminds Airmen to practice safe habits when they’re on the road. 

“The number one killer of Air Force members are motorcycle accidents,” said Daniel, who has over 40 years of experience riding motorcycles. “So, the number one thing you want to do is take a motorcycle class. Then, make sure that you wear Personal Protective Equipment and respect your motorcycle.”

Respecting your motorcycle means knowing the limits of the bike and the rider. Pushing those limits increases the amount of risk the rider takes and can cause an accident.

“What I want bikers to keep in mind is that when you’re riding, you’re invisible,” Daniel said. “So, what you want to do is make yourself visible by keeping an eye on traffic, wear the proper PPE and ride out there nice and safe.”