Engage

Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
Logo
Twitter
Logo
Facebook
10,629
Like Us
Twitter
1,130
Follow Us
YouTube Instagram

News Search

News Comments Updated
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 208
The Youth and Teen Center hosted the Art Blast color run 5K and the America’s Armed Forces Kids fun run at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M on May 20, 2017. During the run, volunteers set up tables along the track with various colored paint powder to toss at the runners transforming their fresh white shirts into a colorful canvas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ilyana A. Escalona) America's Armed Forces Kids fun run 2017
The Youth and Teen Center hosted the Art Blast color run 5K and the America’s Armed Forces Kids fun run on May 20, 2017 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M.“The turnout was amazing,” said Harry Miller, the 49th Force Support Squadron Youth Sports Director.  “In addition to the large number of adults that showed up for the 5k run, we had 89 youngsters
0 5/23
2017
Ret. Gen. John Jumper, former U.S. Air Force chief of staff, speaks to Airmen at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., on 19 May, 2017. During his time here, he was updated on current Remotely Piloted Aircraft training, and was also given a look into the possibilities of future unmanned aircraft technology. Jumper is most known within the RPA community for his work arming the MQ-1 Predator. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Chase Cannon) RPA Innovation
The RQ-1 predator, later designated as the MQ-1, was the right aircraft, at the right time following the events of September 11, 2001. While the nation was recovering from the largest attack in its history since the bombings of Pearl Harbor, members of the Pentagon prepared for a war that they already knew would present new challenges that the
0 5/22
2017
Arin Meyer, a 49th Medical Operations Squadron emergency medical technician-Basic, and Jillian Barker, a 49th MDOS paramedic, pose for a photo outside the fire station for National Emergency Medical Services week at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on May 17, 2017. National EMS week was established in 1974, as a means to honor EMS practitioners and their contributions to families and communities across the United States. Licensing to become an emergency medical technician requires formal training at the EMT-Basic, EMT-Intermediate or EMT-Paramedic level. Training programs are offered at emergency medical service academies and other educational institutions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis P. Docherty) National Emergency Medical Services week
National Emergency Medical Services week kicks off May 22, 2017. As an essential public function, EMS practitioners are a vital component of emergency medicine. However, their life-saving services are often overlooked. National EMS week, established in 1974, serves to honor EMS practitioners and their contributions to families and communities across the United States.
0 5/22
2017
Staff Sgt. Caleb Brooks, 49th Security Forces Squadron, plays taps at the closing ceremony during National Police Week at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on May 15, 2017. National Police Week was established in 1962 by President John F. Kennedy to pay tribute to law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of others, according to the National Peace Officer's Memorial Fund website. Ceremonies are held annually in Washington D.C., as well as in communities across the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stacy Jonsgaard)    National Police Week 2017
The Holloman Air Force Base community observed National Police Week May 15 through 19, culminating in a retreat ceremony here at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M.National Police Week was established in 1962 by President John F. Kennedy to pay tribute to law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty for the safety and protection of
0 5/19
2017
There are many options available to Airmen who are going through a rough time. Seek out a chaplain, a Military Family Life Consultant at the Airman and Family Readiness Center or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-8255. “Admitting to yourself that you need help is one of the most difficult but beneficial things you could do,” said Airman 1st Class Alexander, a 49th Medical mental health technician at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. “Remember that suicide doesn’t end the pain, it just passes it off to someone else.” (Last names are being withheld due to operational requirements. U.S. Air Force illustration by Senior Airman Aaron Montoya) Alcohol and Drug abuse prevention and treatment
“Thank goodness it’s Friday! As soon as I am able to leave work I am going to put on some decent clothes and head over to my friend’s house, have a drink and forget about this week.” A common thought for many people in the United States. What many people may not realize is this thought can become a reoccurring behavior that develops into something
0 5/18
2017
An opening is held for the Wounded Warrior Healing Arts Exhibit at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, on April 12, 2017.   (DoD photo by Roger L. Wollenberg) Photography: An escape for a Holloman Airman
From a young age, Master Sgt. David Long, the 54th Fighter Group staff F-16 base engine manager, has been interested in photography. This is a hobby he picked up from his father but placed second to his short-lived U.S. Army career as an infantryman, and current 15 year U.S. Air Force career as the 54th Fighter Group staff F-16 base engine manager. Photography is David’s therapy, his way to escape from the real world. Once his sight is set through the camera lens, David is in his own world, creating images that he does not even fully notice until after he looks back at his work. David believes his work is aesthetically appealing but has never seen it as a big deal until now.
0 5/16
2017
49th Aircraft Maintenance squadron Airmen hoist an engine cover panel onto an MQ-9 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., May 4, 2017. Holloman AFB conducted surge operations from May 1 to May 5, ramping up operations to accurately measure the full capability of its Airmen and equipment. Holloman Surges RPA operations
Story and photos of Holloman RPA surge week operations
0 5/09
2017
Airman 1st Class Derek King, a 54th Aircraft Maintenance Unit F-16 crew chief, performs recovery operations on an F-16 Fighting Falcon at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on May 4, 2017. Crew chiefs perform a variety of maintenance tasks from oil servicing and tire checks to readying a jet for flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis P. Docherty) F-16 maintainers and fuel specialists run 24 hour operations
Holloman’s 54th Aircraft Maintenance Airmen work tirelessly to keep the F-16 Fighting Falcon, a single-engine supersonic multirole fighter aircraft, flying high above New Mexico’s desert. Responsibilities of F-16 crew chiefs range from maintenance duties to oil servicing and checking tires. Similar to any aircraft, an F-16 can be damaged or break down unexpectedly. The health of an F-16 is dependent upon its maintainers.
0 5/09
2017
An MQ-9 Reaper is loaded with a GBU-12 laser-guided bomb on the left and a GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition on the right April 13, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The JDAM is a GPS guided munition which brings added capability to the warfighters, specifically by aircrews being able to employ weapons through inclement weather. The first two GBU-38s employed in training successfully hit their targets May 1, 2017, over the Nevada Test and Training Range. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen) MQ-9 Reapers add to arsenal with first GBU-38 drop
Airmen from the 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing and the 26th Weapons Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., made history earlier this week, by employing the first GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition from an MQ-9 Reaper.While the JDAM has been around since the late '90s, the munition has just recently been validated and now proven for real
0 5/08
2017
Sarah Hernandez, a 49th Operations Support Squadron range operations center operator, checks the laser board systems on April 21, 2017 at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The ROC operators assist student pilots with dropping bombs on target and scoring how close the ordnance impacted the intended target. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Amanda Junk) Bombs on target
Sarah Hernandez, a 49th Operations Support Squadron operator, calls out to the pilot, “good spot, good spot.”  Her voice fills the range operations center Holloman Air Force Base, NM. The pilot acknowledges and goes kinetic.Another ordnance is on target. Another mission is successful.The range operations center, or ROC, is manned 20 hours a day,
0 5/04
2017
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 208
RSS