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Carlos, an M1 Support Systems aircraft corrosion specialist at Holloman Air Force Base N.M., removes tape used for painting straight lines on a P-80B Shooting Star at Heritage Park here May 16. The P-80B Shooting Star was the first U.S. Air Force jet to be used in combat. This particular jet, Serial Number 49-853, flew combat missions during the Korean War. (Last names are being withheld do to operational requirements) (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Col. Ryan Craycraft, the 49th Wing vice commander, presents an award to Senior Airman Christopher, a 49th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron load crew member from Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., after Christopher’s team won the annual load completion here May 4. Teams from the 54th Fighter Group and the 49th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron here competed by testing their ability to quickly load training weapon systems onto their respective aircraft. (Last names are withheld due to operational requirements) (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Airmen from the 49th Comptroller Squadron at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., work together to complete the last leg of a resiliency training exercise here in April. The staff at outdoor recreation hosts resiliency training exercises to help build team cohesion among Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson.)
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Dorm 335 houses Remotely Piloted Aircraft students at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The on-base lodging is designed to help balance the needs of the students and the training mission at Holloman. Being centrally located allows easy access to their dining, fitness and training facilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Dorm 335 houses Remotely Piloted Aircraft students at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The on-base lodging is designed to help balance the needs of the students and the training mission at Holloman. Being centrally located allows easy access to their dining, fitness and training facilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Airman 1st Class Samuel Kamau, a 49th Medical Group dental technician here, receives a hug from a co-worker after becoming a United States citizen following his naturalization ceremony here April 14. Originally from Kenya, Africa, Kamau joined the Air Force to become a U.S. citizen and for the educational opportunities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Roderick Rose Jr., 15, lines up a shot on a billiard table inside the Youth Center at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on April 1. Rose is the president of the Holloman’s Keystone Club – an organization dedicated on building character and leadership skills in teens. He was recently nominated to participate in a national-level competition that recognizes outstanding young adults. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Members of the 846th Test Squadron at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., watch as another world record is set at the magnetically-levitated sled system here March 4. High-fives and handshakes followed the second successful launch that week—breaking their own world record of 513 mph with 633 mph. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Mari Orona, a cashier at the Shifting Sands Dining Facility, rings up a customer inside the Shifting Sands Dining Facility at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on March 24. Civilian contractors work side by side with dining facility Airmen to serve over 1,000 meals a day to the operational force at Holloman. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Randahl J. Jenson)
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Airman 1st Class David Frias, a 49th Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspection technician, observes a metal part for damages at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on Feb. 22. Frias used a low viscosity penetrant, which fills any voids left by cracks or damage, and indicates a need for repair. The NDI provides mission essential services by inspecting various aircraft parts for damage or corrosion, allowing them to ensure military aviation equipment safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leah Ferrante)
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Airman 1st Class David Frias, a 49th Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspection technician, inspects a metal part for damage at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on Feb. 22. Frias used a low-viscosity penetrant, which fills any voids left by cracks or damage, and indicates a need for repair. After the penetrant is applied, it creates a visible indication of damage. The NDI technicians are able to assist aircraft maintainers by identifying even the smallest amount of damage to aircraft parts in a non-destructive manner, allowing them to ensure military aviation equipment safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leah Ferrante)
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Airman 1st Class David Frias, a 49th Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspection technician, removes the low-viscosity penetrant from a metal part before inspection at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on Feb. 22. The low-viscosity penetrant fills any voids left by cracks or damage, and indicates a need for repair. The NDI technicians are able to assist aircraft maintainers by identifying aircraft damage, allowing them to ensure military aviation equipment safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leah Ferrante)
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Airman 1st Class David Frias, a 49th Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspection technician, dips a metal part in a chemical penetrant at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on Feb. 22. The item is dipped in a low-viscosity penetrant, which fills any voids left by cracks or damage, and indicates a need for repair. NDI technicians are able to assist aircraft maintainers by identifying aircraft damage, allowing them to ensure military aviation equipment safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leah Ferrante)
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Airman 1st Class David Frias, a 49th Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspection technician, looks for damages at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on Feb. 22. The NDI uses a number of tests to ensure all parts are free from cracks or corrosion. The technicians are able to assist aircraft maintainers by identifying aircraft damage, allowing them to ensure military aviation equipment safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leah Ferrante)
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A metal training part sits in a magnetized machine at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. on Feb. 22. The machine pulls magnetic particles to areas of the part that are damaged The 49th Maintenance Squadron non-destructive inspection shop provides mission-essential services by inspecting various aircraft parts for damage or corrosion, allowing them to ensure military aviation equipment safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Leah Ferrante)
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(U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Randahl)
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