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Suit up, load bombs

An US Air Force member lifts the guidance potion of a bomb.

Airman 1st Class Hannah Canfield, 9th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew member, lifts the guidance portion of an inert bomb during an evaluation in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear gear, Jan. 12, 2021, on Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. Load crew members must conduct annual evaluations to keep proficient with all types of training and prepare for working in any combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Young)

An US Airforce member uses a tablet to check technical order while wearing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear equipment.

Staff Sgt. John Hoppe, 9th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew team chief, checks technical orders during an evaluation in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear gear, Jan. 12, 2021, on Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. Technical orders provide uniformed step-by-step procedures for all weapons load crew tasks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Young)

An US Airforce member threads arming wire while wearing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear equipment.

Airman 1st Class Hannah Canfield, 9th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew member, installs an arming wire on an inert bomb during an evaluation in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear gear, Jan. 12, 2021, on Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. Threading arming wire is more difficult while in CBRN gear and benefit from the hands on experience during annual proficiency evaluations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Young)

An US Airforce member threads arming wire while wearing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear equipment.

Airmen from the 9th Aircraft Maintenance Unit line up an inert bomb for installation during an evaluation in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear gear, Jan. 12, 2021, on Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. The three-member team that was tasked with loading munitions onto a MQ-9 Reaper while in full CBRN gear as part of an annual requirement aimed to keep munition troops proficient in their job no matter the environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Young)

An US Airforce member threads arming wire while wearing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear equipment.

Senior Airman Jacob Boren, 9th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew member, installs an arming wire on an inert bomb during an evaluation in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear gear, Jan. 12, 2021, on Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. Arming wire give pilots the control to keep munitions safe until they choose to arm the munition. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Young)

An US Air Force member prepares arming wire while wearing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear equipment.

Senior Airman Jacob Boren, 9th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew member, prepares an arming wire for installation on a MQ-9 Reaper during an evaluation in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear gear, Jan. 12, 2021, on Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico. Most bombs utilize a wire called an arming wire to sense aircraft release and to initiate their arming sequence. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Young)

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --
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